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Research Professor

Christopher Saucedo was born (1964) in Brooklyn, New York where he grew up. He recieved his BFA from New York's School of Visual Arts in 1986 and his MFA from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor in 1988. After attending the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture he did post-graduate work at the Queens University of Belfast, Northern Ireland. Saucedo has exhibited his artwork throughout the United States, with recent exhibitions at Here Art in New York City, The Leedy Voulkos Art Center in Kansas City, Missouri and The Contemporary Arts Center in New Orleans, Louisiana. He has been on the faculty of the University of New Orleans since 1992 where he currently resides.

University of New Orleans sculptor Christopher Saucedo recently installed Flood Marker at the Gentilly intersection of Franklin Avenue and Mithra Street near the UNO campus. Flood Marker, an 8,000-pound freestanding and monumental granite block of water, memorializes the catastrophic 2005 flood that followed Hurricane Katrina. The work was funded with a $25,000 grant from the Joan Mitchell Foundation awarded to Saucedo, Professor of Fine Arts, to stimulate the installation of public sculpture in post-Katrina New Orleans.

Artist Statement - in relation to a joan mitchell funded public installation
This public sculpture is not a literal flood marker; it does not tell us how high the waters rose in any specific part of the city. Instead, it is the aesthetic expression of a defining event in time. Carved into the stone are 1,836 waves, one wave for each life lost to the water. This sculpture is intended to memorialize the New Orleans flood of 2005 without over judgment. The hope and strength of the work are presented in the purposeful carving of a timeless material, the implied narrative of a group effort and the physical reminder that because we have erected this monument we have endured.

Floodwaters rise and recede, and those who survive mark the event and continue. Flood Marker continues this tradition in a literal but also conceptual vein. Rather than a small plaque and waterline attached to any wall, this Flood Marker is an 8,000-pound freestanding granite block of water. The stone is elevated on a series of processional rollers not unlike those that ancient stonecutters used to move the huge stones into place on the pyramids. The great block of water becomes a nomadic monolith at rest. It has the potential to be moved, but only through extreme human effort.

Christopher Saucedo
"Flood Marker"
granite, oak, steel
7' x 5 1/2' x 26'
(stone is 10' x 1 x 4')

Located at Franklin and Mithra in the Gentilly section of New Orleans across from the Milne Boys Home.

 

 

http://www.saucedostudio.com

 
Faculty and Staff
Alexa Arroyo
Doyle Gertjejansen
Cheryl Hayes
Richard Johnson
Ariya Martin
Jim Richard
Jeffrey Rinehart
Kathy Rodriguez
Dan Rule
Christopher Saucedo